Fears grow for Herefordshire's green and pleasant land following massive rise in housing applications

Hereford Times: Fears grow for Herefordshire's green and pleasant land following massive rise in housing applications Fears grow for Herefordshire's green and pleasant land following massive rise in housing applications

A HUGE rise in the number of planned housing developments could adversely alter the character of Herefordshire for good.

That is the belief of residents, councillors and campaign groups after the number of housing plans debated by Herefordshire Council increased by more than 150 per cent last year.

Planning committee members discussed 34 applications for 1,099 homes in 2013 - up from 22 applications for 408 houses in 2012.

And, many more could be in the pipeline for 2014.

Nigel Shore lives in Bartestree - one village where developers want to build homes.

He said that he fears for the community if a rash of applications are approved.

"Potentially, we could have 200 to 300 more homes over the next three years," said Nigel.

"A lot of us are upset about it and are trying to do everything we can to block it.

"It seems like local people are being rolled over by big money and it's a free for all for big developers."

The Hereford Times reported concerns last month from people living in Leominster of the "chaos" they fear 1,500 new homes could bring as part of a planned expansion in the town.

The huge building programme is included in a core strategy plan up until 2031.

Other large-scale developments that have recently been submitted include an application for 290 homes off the A40 near Ross-on-Wye, 120 houses off Hampton Dene Road in Hereford and 76 homes pitched for Bromyard.

Villages are also in the eye of developers. In the past three months alone, applications have been delivered to build 89 properties in Peterchurch, 50 in Bartestree and 25 in Eardisley.

This comes after permission was also granted last year to build 150 homes in Kingstone.

For the full story, see this week's Hereford Times.

Comments (6)

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3:09pm Sun 5 Jan 14

GDJ says...

A thousand new houses is not very many - even if they are all approved.

The level of house prices compared with incomes in Herefordshire is the highest in the West Midlands and yet the HT is constantly reporting on local campaigns to stop houses being built. By `green and pleasant land` do we mean lots of villages that are little more than retirement communities (with correspondingly large adult social care costs) or one where young people can settle and raise families in houses that they can afford to buy or rent?

Are any of the people determined to block new housing actually in rented or shared accommodation themselves? Do their own houses have no impact at all on the environment or is it a case of pulling up the drawbridge once they themselves have a house.

Rather than giving a platform to NIMBYs or BANANAs why does the HT not examine the need for housing, the economics of housing and the demographic pattern of the Herefordshire population and how it affects the county economy.
A thousand new houses is not very many - even if they are all approved. The level of house prices compared with incomes in Herefordshire is the highest in the West Midlands and yet the HT is constantly reporting on local campaigns to stop houses being built. By `green and pleasant land` do we mean lots of villages that are little more than retirement communities (with correspondingly large adult social care costs) or one where young people can settle and raise families in houses that they can afford to buy or rent? Are any of the people determined to block new housing actually in rented or shared accommodation themselves? Do their own houses have no impact at all on the environment or is it a case of pulling up the drawbridge once they themselves have a house. Rather than giving a platform to NIMBYs or BANANAs why does the HT not examine the need for housing, the economics of housing and the demographic pattern of the Herefordshire population and how it affects the county economy. GDJ
  • Score: 12

7:39pm Sun 5 Jan 14

GDJ says...

Perhaps the nod and a wink given by planners to a former council leader that he could build on his land (or profit from someone else doing it later) would make a more interesting story.

http://www.rightmove
.co.uk/property-for-
sale/property-393804
37.html
Perhaps the nod and a wink given by planners to a former council leader that he could build on his land (or profit from someone else doing it later) would make a more interesting story. http://www.rightmove .co.uk/property-for- sale/property-393804 37.html GDJ
  • Score: 9

7:39am Tue 7 Jan 14

GDJ says...

GDJ wrote:
Perhaps the nod and a wink given by planners to a former council leader that he could build on his land (or profit from someone else doing it later) would make a more interesting story.

http://www.rightmove

.co.uk/property-for-

sale/property-393804

37.html
Interestingly, since I posted this the property has been withdrawn from the market. The advert referred to an uplift clause so the buyer would have to pay the vendor extra money in the future if planning permission was granted. And who was the vendor?

Seems someone was made rather uncomfortable at being rumbled.
[quote][p][bold]GDJ[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the nod and a wink given by planners to a former council leader that he could build on his land (or profit from someone else doing it later) would make a more interesting story. http://www.rightmove .co.uk/property-for- sale/property-393804 37.html[/p][/quote]Interestingly, since I posted this the property has been withdrawn from the market. The advert referred to an uplift clause so the buyer would have to pay the vendor extra money in the future if planning permission was granted. And who was the vendor? Seems someone was made rather uncomfortable at being rumbled. GDJ
  • Score: 8

10:47pm Tue 7 Jan 14

dippyhippy says...

Excellent work GDJ!!
Excellent work GDJ!! dippyhippy
  • Score: 6

8:12am Wed 8 Jan 14

GDJ says...

dippyhippy wrote:
Excellent work GDJ!!
Thanks Dippy and Happy New Year
Stories worth commenting on are being strictly limited at the moment - to keep us oddities quiet - unless there is something urgent to say about a cow that didn't actually get stranded - just a bit wet.

I was wondering who alerted JJ to my comment - did the HT ring him up to ask for a response or just to warn him that the natives were on to his little game. It is certainly questionable if a senior councillor engineers a situation where he can personally profit from a planning permission being granted.
I'll bet this doesn't make it to the readers' comments bit in the printed HT.
[quote][p][bold]dippyhippy[/bold] wrote: Excellent work GDJ!![/p][/quote]Thanks Dippy and Happy New Year Stories worth commenting on are being strictly limited at the moment - to keep us oddities quiet - unless there is something urgent to say about a cow that didn't actually get stranded - just a bit wet. I was wondering who alerted JJ to my comment - did the HT ring him up to ask for a response or just to warn him that the natives were on to his little game. It is certainly questionable if a senior councillor engineers a situation where he can personally profit from a planning permission being granted. I'll bet this doesn't make it to the readers' comments bit in the printed HT. GDJ
  • Score: 2

8:43pm Wed 8 Jan 14

P Beddoe says...

GDJ wrote:
A thousand new houses is not very many - even if they are all approved.

The level of house prices compared with incomes in Herefordshire is the highest in the West Midlands and yet the HT is constantly reporting on local campaigns to stop houses being built. By `green and pleasant land` do we mean lots of villages that are little more than retirement communities (with correspondingly large adult social care costs) or one where young people can settle and raise families in houses that they can afford to buy or rent?

Are any of the people determined to block new housing actually in rented or shared accommodation themselves? Do their own houses have no impact at all on the environment or is it a case of pulling up the drawbridge once they themselves have a house.

Rather than giving a platform to NIMBYs or BANANAs why does the HT not examine the need for housing, the economics of housing and the demographic pattern of the Herefordshire population and how it affects the county economy.
I couldn't agree more with the first post. There needs to be far greater balance to this argument and this emotional angle serves only to focus on one narrow view and drum up opposition without full facts considered. We need housing, now. Some idyllic notion that all appropriate housing needs can be met by adding only very small in fill development gradually over the next 15-20 years is fanciful in the extreme and there would be very little control of the mix of housing generated; you can guarantee those able to fit in 2-3 houses on land will not be considering building modest affordable homes! This would however suit many of those in opposition to new homes!!! House builders should be guided to offer community benefit in both community facility provision and the mix of housing provided whilst sympathy with the environment is of course paramount, though this can be achieved and should be where the focus is. General opposition of this sort is seldom driven by selflessness but as the initial poster states tends to be driven by NIMBYism and snobbery. Whilst they say they are not opposing all housing (as they know they can't officially as it's accepted fact that there is a huge shortage), the overall impact of the article is as would be intended and to turn this toward an emotional general opposition to all development, anywhere as this would spoil our 'green and pleasant land'. That need not be true at all. HT should recognise this before dedicating too much air time to these type of opposition groups without looking at the other side of the argument for new housing in a measured way.
[quote][p][bold]GDJ[/bold] wrote: A thousand new houses is not very many - even if they are all approved. The level of house prices compared with incomes in Herefordshire is the highest in the West Midlands and yet the HT is constantly reporting on local campaigns to stop houses being built. By `green and pleasant land` do we mean lots of villages that are little more than retirement communities (with correspondingly large adult social care costs) or one where young people can settle and raise families in houses that they can afford to buy or rent? Are any of the people determined to block new housing actually in rented or shared accommodation themselves? Do their own houses have no impact at all on the environment or is it a case of pulling up the drawbridge once they themselves have a house. Rather than giving a platform to NIMBYs or BANANAs why does the HT not examine the need for housing, the economics of housing and the demographic pattern of the Herefordshire population and how it affects the county economy.[/p][/quote]I couldn't agree more with the first post. There needs to be far greater balance to this argument and this emotional angle serves only to focus on one narrow view and drum up opposition without full facts considered. We need housing, now. Some idyllic notion that all appropriate housing needs can be met by adding only very small in fill development gradually over the next 15-20 years is fanciful in the extreme and there would be very little control of the mix of housing generated; you can guarantee those able to fit in 2-3 houses on land will not be considering building modest affordable homes! This would however suit many of those in opposition to new homes!!! House builders should be guided to offer community benefit in both community facility provision and the mix of housing provided whilst sympathy with the environment is of course paramount, though this can be achieved and should be where the focus is. General opposition of this sort is seldom driven by selflessness but as the initial poster states tends to be driven by NIMBYism and snobbery. Whilst they say they are not opposing all housing (as they know they can't officially as it's accepted fact that there is a huge shortage), the overall impact of the article is as would be intended and to turn this toward an emotional general opposition to all development, anywhere as this would spoil our 'green and pleasant land'. That need not be true at all. HT should recognise this before dedicating too much air time to these type of opposition groups without looking at the other side of the argument for new housing in a measured way. P Beddoe
  • Score: 9

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