Turbines will deter tourists

Turbines will deter tourists

Turbines will deter tourists

First published in Letters
Last updated

GOOD luck to those fighting a wind turbine at Pencombe.

Few doubt we need to reduce carbon emissions; the arguments are about how it should be done.

Onshore turbines represent the inequalities between urban and rural Britain and between powerful, profit-driven, lobbies and individuals in the majority. The countryside is heavily reliant upon agriculture and tourism.

Visit Britain inbound tourism figures for 2013 show 32.8 million tourists visited the UK, spending £21 billion. Statistics from Great Britain Day Visits 2013 show indigenous day visits to Wales as 89 million and to southwest England and West Midlands as 290 million. These generated £3 billion and £10 billion of spending respectively.

These visitors did not go to view wind turbines but to indulge in a wide variety of interests and, I venture to suggest, to get away from such structures.

By orders of magnitude, more energy is consumed and wasted in cities through profligate heating, air conditioning and sending megawatts of light into night skies above empty streets. Why should the countryside have one of its main income sources destroyed to support this? It is not necessary to consume excessive energy and it is possible to live without amenities/services within minutes of the doorstep.

Wind turbines are industrial structures and belong in industrial cities, albeit at less efficiency, where the greatest pollution is generated. In counter-balance there would be savings in infrastructure, sub-stations, transmission pylons and cabling. Where are the wind turbines across London and Brussels? Might it be that they would damage tourism? Where is the commitment of those who legislate?

The 2nd inequality and injustice is that a miniscule number of land stewards, prepared to damage the livelihoods and leisure of others, are subsidised by the majority, even to the extent not to generate electricity at certain times.

For decades I have regularly visited hills and mountains for recreation and consequently, like millions, spend money in the vicinity. I avoid areas such as Newtown, Powys, because of the blight of wind turbines.

Wind turbines in areas such as Herefordshire and Powys cannot be justified because the damage they cause is greater than the benefit they provide.

Those planned in areas like Stonewall Hill near Presteigne and Pencombe are the thin end of a wedge and represent the use of power for the financial benefit of a minute number of people in the countryside yet an immeasurably small benefit to the greater community.

ROD GARVEY Bush Bank, Hereford

Comments (3)

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2:59pm Sat 30 Aug 14

stan)konta says...

What nonsense! "Where are the wind turbine in London and Brussels? Might it be that they would damage tourism?"

Ever heard of the London Array? http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/London_Arra
y

Oh and guess what, tourists actually pay good money to go on cruises to visit the wind farm. http://www.greta1892
.co.uk/imagegallery/
imagegallery.html

I understand the resistance to an extent, but your arguments are ludicrous and entirely subjective. Also, bear in mind that these are temporary structures, would you prefer them to dig up Pencombe (incidentally, probably my favourite spot in the whole of our beautiful county) for shale gas fracking? Or bury nuclear waste there which can't be touched for 100,000s of years. Because they're going to have to do something to generate power.

We really need to follow the example of the Minnesota / Mid-West model of getting communities really involved in managing and profiting from these sorts of developments, rather than entering, engaging in some PR and then leaving untouchable turbine parks after them. This can be a great thing, an attraction, and something to bind communities together.
What nonsense! "Where are the wind turbine in London and Brussels? Might it be that they would damage tourism?" Ever heard of the London Array? http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/London_Arra y Oh and guess what, tourists actually pay good money to go on cruises to visit the wind farm. http://www.greta1892 .co.uk/imagegallery/ imagegallery.html I understand the resistance to an extent, but your arguments are ludicrous and entirely subjective. Also, bear in mind that these are temporary structures, would you prefer them to dig up Pencombe (incidentally, probably my favourite spot in the whole of our beautiful county) for shale gas fracking? Or bury nuclear waste there which can't be touched for 100,000s of years. Because they're going to have to do something to generate power. We really need to follow the example of the Minnesota / Mid-West model of getting communities really involved in managing and profiting from these sorts of developments, rather than entering, engaging in some PR and then leaving untouchable turbine parks after them. This can be a great thing, an attraction, and something to bind communities together. stan)konta
  • Score: 2

12:40pm Sun 31 Aug 14

denon says...

I don't like on shore turbines, but do you look to see where turbines are before you go off on your holidays?
I don't like on shore turbines, but do you look to see where turbines are before you go off on your holidays? denon
  • Score: 2

5:43am Fri 5 Sep 14

General Cafuffle says...

I think a wind turbine would be an excellent addition to the Cathedral Tower
symbolising a fusion of new and old, what a marvelous sight to promote Hereford on the world stage.
I think a wind turbine would be an excellent addition to the Cathedral Tower symbolising a fusion of new and old, what a marvelous sight to promote Hereford on the world stage. General Cafuffle
  • Score: -1
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