'Lost village' of Studmarsh unearthed by archaeologists

Volunteers and Herefordshire Council archaeology supervisor David Williams (in trench, right) investigate the foundations of a large medieval house near Bromyard.

Volunteers and Herefordshire Council archaeology supervisor David Williams (in trench, right) investigate the foundations of a large medieval house near Bromyard.

First published in News by

MORE evidence has been uncovered as the search for the lost village of Studmarsh continues.

A team of archaeologists and volunteers from mental health charity Herefordshire Mind has spent two weeks digging at the National Trust’s Brockhampton Estate , near Bromyard , in a bid to uncover the remains of the village.

Studmarsh was mentioned as a settlement in medieval documents but little has been known about the place for more than 500 years.

So far the foundations of the end corner of a large stonebuilt structure with walls up to one metre wide have been unearthed, along with a stone-lined foundation to support a timber framed cross wall and external doorway, suggesting a manor house may have once stood on the site.

And along the hillside, what appeared to be rubble foundations for a much smaller building with wattle and daub walls were found.

Pottery dating back to the 13th and 14th century was also found in and around the remains.

Ian Bapty, lead officer for the project, said: “All this is quite exciting. A reasonable preliminary interpretation is that we have not only found the lost village of Studmarsh, but that the presence of these two very different buildings demonstrates that it was very much a village as we understand that term."

Pottery found on site suggests the village was abandoned in the 14th century.

“While we don’t know for sure why the village declined, the impact of catastrophic events around that time such as the Black Death, may be significant factors," said Ian.

 

Comments (7)

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8:21am Wed 19 Sep 12

Clarkester says...

What will Bobby47 think of this?
They are clearly looking in the right place.
And, I may be proved wrong on this point, but from the story I am thinking that they have found what looks like a big house, and what looks like a small house.
Two houses do not a village make, surely? Unless the big house is really, really, really big. Making the small house just really big.
What will Bobby47 think of this? They are clearly looking in the right place. And, I may be proved wrong on this point, but from the story I am thinking that they have found what looks like a big house, and what looks like a small house. Two houses do not a village make, surely? Unless the big house is really, really, really big. Making the small house just really big. Clarkester
  • Score: 0

2:21pm Wed 19 Sep 12

bobby47 says...

Very hurt and down at the moment Clarkester. However, I do think they've been lucky with their dig, whilst I, at my dig, have been met with so many problems which of course only compounded and added to the main error I made thirty years ago when I ignored all sane advice and commonsense and began digging for Studmarsh in the wrong place.
That said, my book, Digging For Studmarsh in the Wrong Place deals with this very issue at Chapter Two, titled, ' Where in Gods name is it?'
If you take the trouble to read you'll note that had I not found the remains of a Pot Bellied Razorback suckling Sow that showed signs of being strangled, the villagers preferred method of killing swine and oneanother, then I'd have packed up and gone home long ago instead of wasting my entire life excavating millions of tons of earth and destroying the panoramic views from Kington toward the Welsh Hills.
My very warmest regards.
Very hurt and down at the moment Clarkester. However, I do think they've been lucky with their dig, whilst I, at my dig, have been met with so many problems which of course only compounded and added to the main error I made thirty years ago when I ignored all sane advice and commonsense and began digging for Studmarsh in the wrong place. That said, my book, Digging For Studmarsh in the Wrong Place deals with this very issue at Chapter Two, titled, ' Where in Gods name is it?' If you take the trouble to read you'll note that had I not found the remains of a Pot Bellied Razorback suckling Sow that showed signs of being strangled, the villagers preferred method of killing swine and oneanother, then I'd have packed up and gone home long ago instead of wasting my entire life excavating millions of tons of earth and destroying the panoramic views from Kington toward the Welsh Hills. My very warmest regards. bobby47
  • Score: 0

4:44pm Wed 19 Sep 12

probono says...

I thought those views had been covered in conifers long ago. If you do not keep quiet about Studmarsh you will have Tony Robinson and the Striped Jumper Prof down there.
I thought those views had been covered in conifers long ago. If you do not keep quiet about Studmarsh you will have Tony Robinson and the Striped Jumper Prof down there. probono
  • Score: 0

10:23pm Wed 19 Sep 12

silentbull says...

Just think, in a few years time maybe people will be saying....

...Where has the beautiful city of Hereford gone ??
Just think, in a few years time maybe people will be saying.... ...Where has the beautiful city of Hereford gone ?? silentbull
  • Score: 0

10:13am Fri 21 Sep 12

richybeaver says...

Presumably, Studmarsh disappeared because the Cattle Market moved.
Presumably, Studmarsh disappeared because the Cattle Market moved. richybeaver
  • Score: 0

11:22am Fri 21 Sep 12

bobby47 says...

richybeaver, Nonsense and if anyone can spot nonsense its me.
The demise of Studmarsh had nothing to do with the closure of the Cattle Market or the Farmers Club and anyone who says differently is an embellisher of the truth and I'll tell you now this world would be a whole lot better off without embellishers and distorter's of the facts.
The truth behind the disappearance of Studmarsh, which I deal with in Chapter forty of my book, 'Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place', titled, 'In Gods name, where have they all gone?', is that they began a terrible practice of strangling their herd of Pot Bellied Razorback pigs. Not content with that, they began to turn on oneanother, strangling a villager at least once a week. Before a year had passed there was only one man left who hadn't been strangled and he, in a pit of angst and depression, hung himself, thus bringing about the end of the village.
And that the truth.
richybeaver, Nonsense and if anyone can spot nonsense its me. The demise of Studmarsh had nothing to do with the closure of the Cattle Market or the Farmers Club and anyone who says differently is an embellisher of the truth and I'll tell you now this world would be a whole lot better off without embellishers and distorter's of the facts. The truth behind the disappearance of Studmarsh, which I deal with in Chapter forty of my book, 'Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place', titled, 'In Gods name, where have they all gone?', is that they began a terrible practice of strangling their herd of Pot Bellied Razorback pigs. Not content with that, they began to turn on oneanother, strangling a villager at least once a week. Before a year had passed there was only one man left who hadn't been strangled and he, in a pit of angst and depression, hung himself, thus bringing about the end of the village. And that the truth. bobby47
  • Score: 0

12:01pm Thu 4 Oct 12

bobby47 says...

Yes, the book is an interesting read. It tells the story of me, an interesting man who, one autumn Tuesday, thirty years ago, woke up and without a thought, plan or prior warning gathered up his tools and provisions and walked thirty miles toward Kington and the Welsh Hills to locate the lost village of Studmarsh, a medieval site historically noted for being in close proximity to Bromyard.
Within days of digging I found a very interesting thing which prompted me to yell, 'What an interesting thing'. It was in fact the skeleton of a mature male ferret that had clearly choked on a rancid mellon. This totally irrelevant discovery quickly convinced me that I was getting exited, overwhelmed and near to passing out by a find that had nothing to do with Studmarsh. Keen not to lose my mind and my focus on the point of my excavations in what was clearly the wrong place, I quickly swalled another diazepam and slowly consumed a generous handfull of Magic Mushrooms and continued my crazed and demented burrowing for my nemesis Studmarsh.
My publisher suggested that the book lacked romance so I introduced into the book a lovely northern lady named Faith Bottomley who'd been made redundant from a Scratching factory. She was a redhead. No hair just a red head. Alas, she didn't stay with me long. I made a clumsy pass at her, she reacted badly, attacked me with a seven pound Shakespeare lump hammer and left vowing never to return. I do miss her.
In the book, Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place I have taken the trouble to make a daily diary entry that allows the reader to chart my progress or lack of it. One of the highlights was the entry, dated Monday, 14th, June, 1987 which reads, ' The Kington ramblers were most helpful. They untied me from the tree. Dressed me and reported to the local Police that I'd been violated by a number of passing Sheep rustlers.'
Now please, Hereford Times moderators, for the love of God, remove this story forever.
My warmest regards.
Yes, the book is an interesting read. It tells the story of me, an interesting man who, one autumn Tuesday, thirty years ago, woke up and without a thought, plan or prior warning gathered up his tools and provisions and walked thirty miles toward Kington and the Welsh Hills to locate the lost village of Studmarsh, a medieval site historically noted for being in close proximity to Bromyard. Within days of digging I found a very interesting thing which prompted me to yell, 'What an interesting thing'. It was in fact the skeleton of a mature male ferret that had clearly choked on a rancid mellon. This totally irrelevant discovery quickly convinced me that I was getting exited, overwhelmed and near to passing out by a find that had nothing to do with Studmarsh. Keen not to lose my mind and my focus on the point of my excavations in what was clearly the wrong place, I quickly swalled another diazepam and slowly consumed a generous handfull of Magic Mushrooms and continued my crazed and demented burrowing for my nemesis Studmarsh. My publisher suggested that the book lacked romance so I introduced into the book a lovely northern lady named Faith Bottomley who'd been made redundant from a Scratching factory. She was a redhead. No hair just a red head. Alas, she didn't stay with me long. I made a clumsy pass at her, she reacted badly, attacked me with a seven pound Shakespeare lump hammer and left vowing never to return. I do miss her. In the book, Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place I have taken the trouble to make a daily diary entry that allows the reader to chart my progress or lack of it. One of the highlights was the entry, dated Monday, 14th, June, 1987 which reads, ' The Kington ramblers were most helpful. They untied me from the tree. Dressed me and reported to the local Police that I'd been violated by a number of passing Sheep rustlers.' Now please, Hereford Times moderators, for the love of God, remove this story forever. My warmest regards. bobby47
  • Score: 0

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