Digging deep to learn about Herefordshire's past

First published in News

RESIDENTS looking to dig deep into Herefordshire’s past are being invited to a hilltop excavation in the Golden Valley.


A 5,000-year-old site in Dorstone has been studied as part of a project to learn more about the lives of the first Neolithic farmers in the county.


Herefordshire Council has teamed up with staff and students at Manchester University over the summer.

Among the evidence unearthed at Arthur’s Stone includes pottery from the Early Neolithic period around 3,500BC.

“This was the age when the great megalithic chambered tombs like Arthur’s Stone were built,” said Professor Julian Thomas, from the university.

“It was a period that witnessed a remarkable first flourishing of farming groups who herded cattle in clearings and open country.

“This exciting project is looking for the first time in Britain simultaneously at a group of such sites within direct sight and close walking distance of one another.”

Those interested in the findings are invited to visit the excavations at Dorstone Hill on Sunday (9th) between 1pm and 4pm.

Next Wednesday (12th), Prof Thomas will deliver a talk on the findings of the project at the St Peter’s Church Centre in Peterchurch from 7.30pm.
 

Comments (3)

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11:37pm Wed 5 Sep 12

bobby47 says...

I would respectfully urge Professor Thomas to approach the 'dig' upon Dorstone Hill with a very open mind. The very first crucial decisions to be made are, 'am I digging in the right place? and more importantly, have I got a spade?
My advice would be, dont be afraid to completely ignore common sense, historical documents and the mass of evidence that suggests that Arthur's Stone is the true place to dig.
Having some considerable experience in this field of work, namely, digging to find the medieval village of Studmarsh, in the completely wrong place, I would strongly urge him to consider digging in an area that has little or no likelyhood of throwing up any positive finds. Then, if you do find something its a happy and pleasant surprise.
My book, 'Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place' will help Professor Thomas during those dark hours when he will question whether or not his spade is up to the job and can he be bothered to carry on digging endless lumps of earth.
I would respectfully urge Professor Thomas to approach the 'dig' upon Dorstone Hill with a very open mind. The very first crucial decisions to be made are, 'am I digging in the right place? and more importantly, have I got a spade? My advice would be, dont be afraid to completely ignore common sense, historical documents and the mass of evidence that suggests that Arthur's Stone is the true place to dig. Having some considerable experience in this field of work, namely, digging to find the medieval village of Studmarsh, in the completely wrong place, I would strongly urge him to consider digging in an area that has little or no likelyhood of throwing up any positive finds. Then, if you do find something its a happy and pleasant surprise. My book, 'Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place' will help Professor Thomas during those dark hours when he will question whether or not his spade is up to the job and can he be bothered to carry on digging endless lumps of earth. bobby47
  • Score: 0

8:33am Thu 6 Sep 12

Clarkester says...

I think i might quite like to read: "Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place." Where can I get a copy?
I think i might quite like to read: "Digging for Studmarsh in the Wrong Place." Where can I get a copy? Clarkester
  • Score: 0

10:43am Thu 6 Sep 12

bobby47 says...

Clarkester, Its hard to get your hands on it, primarily because no library or retail store were prepared to be associated with a book that Richard & Judy described as the work of an idiot who's vast removal of earth and rock ruined the panoramic views from Kington toward the Welsh Hills.
Clarkester, Its hard to get your hands on it, primarily because no library or retail store were prepared to be associated with a book that Richard & Judy described as the work of an idiot who's vast removal of earth and rock ruined the panoramic views from Kington toward the Welsh Hills. bobby47
  • Score: 0

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