Kempley Remembers...

First published in News by

AN OBELISK of natural stone will stand as an enduring memorial of the Kempley men who marched away to the First World War, and never returned.

The memorial, on the village green, will be set in place in September, but the official unveiling will take place, poignantly, on the last day of British Summer Time, Saturday October 25.

Kempley people have responded generously to the Kempley Memorial Project.

An appeal for funds went through the letterbox of every Kempley household, 120 homes in total, last month, and already £1700 is in the kitty, towards a target of £3000.

An appeal has also been launched to find out more about the nine Kempley servicemen whose names will be on the memorial plaques

Project spokesman, Tony Prisk of Kempley Green said: "We are still looking for more details about the men who died. We have some information, but we would like some more."

There will be a plaque representing each of the men, and the plaques will be set in a circle of paved stones, surrounding the obelisk.

The names around the obelisk will be as follows: Corporal Frederick Dyer; Private William Alfred Hodges; L/Corp Henry Charles Jones; Private Samuel Kirby; Private Benjamin Lane; Private Alfred Manns; Private Frank Manns; Private Hubert Powell; Flight Sergeant Colin Robert Morley.

Anyone with information on the men, or wishing to make a donation towards the project, should phone 01531 890518 or 890617.

Comments (1)

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12:05pm Thu 7 Aug 14

Kempley says...

Not all the residents agree with this.
No planning permission required as the Parish council can do what they like.
I do feel very strongly that there should be no alteration to the green, which is regularly used for recreation & enjoyment by parishioners and visitors..
Having seen & heard the discussions I urge all readers to inform the Parish council of the LAW.

http://archive.defra
.gov.uk/rural/docume
nts/protected/common
-land/tvgprotect-faq
.pdf

Noting especially "
Section 12 of the Inclosure Act 1857 makes it a criminal offence to:

wilfully cause injury or damage to any fence on a green;

wilfully take any cattle or other animals onto a green without lawful authority


wilfully lay any manure, soil, ashes, rubbish or other material on a green;

undertake any act which causes injury to the green (e.g.
digging turf); or

undertake any act which interrupts the use or enjoyment of a green as a place of
exercise and recreation (
e.g. fencing a green so as to prevent access).
4
Section 29 of the Commons Act 1876 makes it a public nuisance to:

encroach on a green (
e.g.
extending the boundary of an abutting property so as to exclude people from that area);

inclose a green (
i.e
. by fencing it in, whether or not the effect is to exclude public access);

erect any structure other than for the purpose of the better enjoyment of the green;
or

disturb, occupy or interfere with the soil of the green (
e.g
. camping) other than for the purpose of the better enjoyment of that green.
If the above provisions were to be interpreted strictly, an act which causes any
injury to a green would appear to be an offence under section 12 of the 1857 Act and any
disturbance or interference with the soil of the green (other than for the purpose of better
enjoyment of the green) would technically be deemed a public nuisance under section
29 of the 1876 Act. However, in Defra’s view, in considering whether or not any given
development or action contravenes either or both of these statutes a court is likely to be
concerned with whether material harm has been caused to a green and whether there
has been interference with the public’s recreational enjoyment. Other issues that might
be relevant include the proportion of a green affected by the development or activity and
the duration of the interference."

Also the council have cut down a oak tree for this monument.

Many children enjoy plating on the green.

My family & I are extremely opposed to any memorial going on the green.
Not all the residents agree with this. No planning permission required as the Parish council can do what they like. I do feel very strongly that there should be no alteration to the green, which is regularly used for recreation & enjoyment by parishioners and visitors.. Having seen & heard the discussions I urge all readers to inform the Parish council of the LAW. http://archive.defra .gov.uk/rural/docume nts/protected/common -land/tvgprotect-faq .pdf Noting especially " Section 12 of the Inclosure Act 1857 makes it a criminal offence to: • wilfully cause injury or damage to any fence on a green; • wilfully take any cattle or other animals onto a green without lawful authority • wilfully lay any manure, soil, ashes, rubbish or other material on a green; • undertake any act which causes injury to the green (e.g. digging turf); or • undertake any act which interrupts the use or enjoyment of a green as a place of exercise and recreation ( e.g. fencing a green so as to prevent access). 4 Section 29 of the Commons Act 1876 makes it a public nuisance to: • encroach on a green ( e.g. extending the boundary of an abutting property so as to exclude people from that area); • inclose a green ( i.e . by fencing it in, whether or not the effect is to exclude public access); • erect any structure other than for the purpose of the better enjoyment of the green; or • disturb, occupy or interfere with the soil of the green ( e.g . camping) other than for the purpose of the better enjoyment of that green. If the above provisions were to be interpreted strictly, an act which causes any injury to a green would appear to be an offence under section 12 of the 1857 Act and any disturbance or interference with the soil of the green (other than for the purpose of better enjoyment of the green) would technically be deemed a public nuisance under section 29 of the 1876 Act. However, in Defra’s view, in considering whether or not any given development or action contravenes either or both of these statutes a court is likely to be concerned with whether material harm has been caused to a green and whether there has been interference with the public’s recreational enjoyment. Other issues that might be relevant include the proportion of a green affected by the development or activity and the duration of the interference." Also the council have cut down a oak tree for this monument. Many children enjoy plating on the green. My family & I are extremely opposed to any memorial going on the green. Kempley
  • Score: 0

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