Woman rescued from River Wye near Mordiford in early hours of New Year's Day

Hereford Times: A woman was rescued from the River Wye. A woman was rescued from the River Wye.

A WOMAN was rescued from the River Wye near Mordiford in the early hours of New Year's Day.

Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) paramedics, a paramedic area support office, an ambulance crew and a BASICS doctor attended the river, near Luckshall Caravan Park, at around 3.30am.

Four fire crews and police were also called.

The woman was rescued and treated for the effects of hypothermia before being taken to Hereford County Hospital.

The start of 2014 was a very busy period for West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS), with crews receiving a 999 call every four minutes.

In total, there were 1,875 calls from 8pm on New Year's Eve to 5am on New Year's Day - with 39 of them occurring in Herefordshire.

The majority of the calls were alcohol-related and included assaults, overdoses, road traffic collisions and falls.

“It’s thanks to the meticulous planning, hard work and dedication of staff on New Year’s Eve that we’re able to continue to provide patients in the West Midlands with high level care when they need it the most," said WMAS chief executive Anthony Marsh.

“New Year’s Eve is traditionally the busiest night of the year for the ambulance service.

"I am immensely proud of the way the service has dealt with the surge in 999 calls."

Comments (9)

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9:41am Thu 2 Jan 14

dippyhippy says...

Really pleased that there was a positive outcome for this lady, the river can be a dangerous place at the best of times, in full flood, the outcome could have been very different.

The figures provided by the ambulance service, unfortunately make for predictable reading.
There really should be some sort of "Personal Responsibility" law, which sees some hefty fines dished out to those who drink themselves to oblivion, and then expect our paramedics and A&E department to sort them out.
They never seem to learn when enough is enough!
Its only when an ambulance isn't available to respond to a genuine life threatening emergency, and the ensuing public outcry, that anything will be done.
A short, sharp shock, that hits them in the pocket, might make folk think twice!
Really pleased that there was a positive outcome for this lady, the river can be a dangerous place at the best of times, in full flood, the outcome could have been very different. The figures provided by the ambulance service, unfortunately make for predictable reading. There really should be some sort of "Personal Responsibility" law, which sees some hefty fines dished out to those who drink themselves to oblivion, and then expect our paramedics and A&E department to sort them out. They never seem to learn when enough is enough! Its only when an ambulance isn't available to respond to a genuine life threatening emergency, and the ensuing public outcry, that anything will be done. A short, sharp shock, that hits them in the pocket, might make folk think twice! dippyhippy

11:15am Thu 2 Jan 14

littlewhitebull says...

dippyhippy wrote:
Really pleased that there was a positive outcome for this lady, the river can be a dangerous place at the best of times, in full flood, the outcome could have been very different.

The figures provided by the ambulance service, unfortunately make for predictable reading.
There really should be some sort of "Personal Responsibility" law, which sees some hefty fines dished out to those who drink themselves to oblivion, and then expect our paramedics and A&E department to sort them out.
They never seem to learn when enough is enough!
Its only when an ambulance isn't available to respond to a genuine life threatening emergency, and the ensuing public outcry, that anything will be done.
A short, sharp shock, that hits them in the pocket, might make folk think twice!
Quite agree with dippyhippy - some excellent suggestions, as usual. Personal responsibility is lacking in some quarters; it's always somebody else's fault is a phrase that irks me.
Our emergency service personnel are brilliant, and they are always there to help out in any situation.
Happy New Year to dippyhippy and all others.
Let's hope it's a great year for all.
[quote][p][bold]dippyhippy[/bold] wrote: Really pleased that there was a positive outcome for this lady, the river can be a dangerous place at the best of times, in full flood, the outcome could have been very different. The figures provided by the ambulance service, unfortunately make for predictable reading. There really should be some sort of "Personal Responsibility" law, which sees some hefty fines dished out to those who drink themselves to oblivion, and then expect our paramedics and A&E department to sort them out. They never seem to learn when enough is enough! Its only when an ambulance isn't available to respond to a genuine life threatening emergency, and the ensuing public outcry, that anything will be done. A short, sharp shock, that hits them in the pocket, might make folk think twice![/p][/quote]Quite agree with dippyhippy - some excellent suggestions, as usual. Personal responsibility is lacking in some quarters; it's always somebody else's fault is a phrase that irks me. Our emergency service personnel are brilliant, and they are always there to help out in any situation. Happy New Year to dippyhippy and all others. Let's hope it's a great year for all. littlewhitebull

12:09pm Thu 2 Jan 14

adam0573 says...

It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital.
It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital. adam0573

1:06pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Everywhere says...

adam0573 wrote:
It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital.
Good that the lady is recovering .....
It's a real pity ( but in my humble opinion typical ) that the HT has not reported the full story relating to what the Police Officers did to help this person.
[quote][p][bold]adam0573[/bold] wrote: It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital.[/p][/quote]Good that the lady is recovering ..... It's a real pity ( but in my humble opinion typical ) that the HT has not reported the full story relating to what the Police Officers did to help this person. Everywhere

1:14pm Thu 2 Jan 14

adam0573 says...

The police would not normally proactively inform the media re this type of incident with regard to what actions were taken by officers. It is common place that as the first reponse to incidents poice officers will have to do all kinds of extraordinary things. We do recognise officers who go beyond the expected in annual commendation ceremonies and these are covered by the media at that time. I have only commented on this thread today as I have just been on the phone to the officers who are on days off now to let them know that the lady is recovering. I'll not critisise HT as they have reported what they have been given and it's quite possible on New Year's Day when dealing with the aftermath of New Year's Eve we could not find a spare officer or moment to give them a comment.
The police would not normally proactively inform the media re this type of incident with regard to what actions were taken by officers. It is common place that as the first reponse to incidents poice officers will have to do all kinds of extraordinary things. We do recognise officers who go beyond the expected in annual commendation ceremonies and these are covered by the media at that time. I have only commented on this thread today as I have just been on the phone to the officers who are on days off now to let them know that the lady is recovering. I'll not critisise HT as they have reported what they have been given and it's quite possible on New Year's Day when dealing with the aftermath of New Year's Eve we could not find a spare officer or moment to give them a comment. adam0573

1:27pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Everywhere says...

Adam , I accept most of what you say , however West Mercia Police do have a Press Office and should be fully uptodate with what is happening within the Police Area , they then should be circulating the details to the relevant newspapers , therefore from what you write it's the WM Police Press Office that is at fault - I therefore withdraw my comments about the HT.
Adam , I accept most of what you say , however West Mercia Police do have a Press Office and should be fully uptodate with what is happening within the Police Area , they then should be circulating the details to the relevant newspapers , therefore from what you write it's the WM Police Press Office that is at fault - I therefore withdraw my comments about the HT. Everywhere

2:14pm Thu 2 Jan 14

adam0573 says...

Everywhere wrote:
Adam , I accept most of what you say , however West Mercia Police do have a Press Office and should be fully uptodate with what is happening within the Police Area , they then should be circulating the details to the relevant newspapers , therefore from what you write it's the WM Police Press Office that is at fault - I therefore withdraw my comments about the HT.
agreed in full - that's why i stepped in a day after. Will give the required internal feedback. but will keep focus on what's important here, good work done by all services in saving a life in danger. all the best folks.
[quote][p][bold]Everywhere[/bold] wrote: Adam , I accept most of what you say , however West Mercia Police do have a Press Office and should be fully uptodate with what is happening within the Police Area , they then should be circulating the details to the relevant newspapers , therefore from what you write it's the WM Police Press Office that is at fault - I therefore withdraw my comments about the HT.[/p][/quote]agreed in full - that's why i stepped in a day after. Will give the required internal feedback. but will keep focus on what's important here, good work done by all services in saving a life in danger. all the best folks. adam0573

3:50pm Thu 2 Jan 14

dippyhippy says...

adam0573 wrote:
It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital.
Thanks so much for taking the time to post this information Adam. Great to hear that the lady involved is recovering.
All of our emergency services do such a fantastic job, we are extremely fortunate to have them, and our wonderful NHS service!

And a very Happy New Year to you Littlewhitebull! And all others who take the time to post upon these pages!
[quote][p][bold]adam0573[/bold] wrote: It was the police who were first responders in this case and two officers spent a long time on a fallen tree branch half in the water keeping the woman's head above the water until she could be rescued by the partner agencies with all the right gear. There will be recognition for the officers to follow. Most importantly, the lady is doing well in hospital.[/p][/quote]Thanks so much for taking the time to post this information Adam. Great to hear that the lady involved is recovering. All of our emergency services do such a fantastic job, we are extremely fortunate to have them, and our wonderful NHS service! And a very Happy New Year to you Littlewhitebull! And all others who take the time to post upon these pages! dippyhippy

9:23pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Everywhere says...

Well done , very brave.

Hereford Constables Nominated For Award After Brave Actions
Two police officers are being nominated for a Royal Humane Society award after helping to rescue a distressed woman from the River Wye on New Years Day.
PC Chris Lea and PC Steven Blake both work at Hereford and both joined the police service in 2002.PC Chris Lea and PC Steven Blake
At about 3am on 1st January police received a call from a man reporting that a woman was in the river. The rural location between Hereford and Ross on Wye meant that the woman was not easy to trace.
When the woman was found PC Blake removed his outer items of uniform, utility belt and body armour and immediately entered the water through deeper and deeper water until he could no longer stand on the bottom. He used the tree trunk and branches as support, but due to the density of branches and the speed of the flood waters he was unable to reach the woman. It was very cold, raining and there was a strong wind blowing. When PC Blake realised he could not reach the woman he came out of the river, used the fallen tree to scale along and dropped down into the water next to the woman.
PC Lea entered the river up to his thighs, climbed the tree, edged along it and used his torch to illuminate the area for PC Blake. During the next 20 minutes he continued to relay clear details of what was happening, via his personal radio, to the control room and other colleagues who were arriving.
PC Blake lifted the woman’s head up out of the water and held her body up so her head stayed out of the water, she remained unresponsive. The woman’s coat had become caught in a branch which prevented her being swept down the river. PC Blake remained with her in the water until Hereford and Worcestershire Fire and Rescue Service arrived with their inflatable boat. At about 4.35am fire and rescue personnel recovered the woman from the river and also helped PC Blake to the river bank.
The woman was then carried part way across the field by a fire and rescue officer. A stretcher was brought over the field by fire and rescue colleagues and PC Lea, who was very wet and cold by this time, also helped to carry the stretcher across the field, over a stile and up a steep bank to a waiting ambulance.
The woman was completely unresponsive and received emergency medical treatment from West Midlands Ambulance Service colleagues to try and restore signs of life. She was treated by an on scene trauma doctor and immediately rushed to the Accident and Emergency department at Hereford County Hospital. She was later admitted to the High Dependency Unit in an attempt to stabilise her condition. Later the same day she was awake and able to talk to officers about what had happened.
Inspector Bob Barnett said: “We cannot under play the critical role these two officers played in saving this woman’s life. The River Wye was in full flood and exceptionally dangerous. The weather itself was extremely inclement. This coupled with complete darkness would undoubtedly have made both officers apprehensive for their own safety and future of their own families. Yet in the highest traditions of policing in this country both put the life of a complete stranger above their own.
“I have no doubt that without the prompt action by both officers, in their initial searching and subsequent entering of the River Wye, this woman would have died. PC Blake’s persistence is of particular note. The measured risks he took in entering the River Wye twice and remaining with her until fire and rescue colleagues arrived ensured that the life of the woman was saved”.
The 40 year old woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, is now out of hospital and recovering at home in Herefordshire.
She added: “The officers were brilliant, they were really brave and I take my hat off to them. I want to thank them and it’s thanks to them I’m alive. They went beyond the line of duty – it was pitch dark and the river was flooded, I couldn’t feel the bottom. I’m really glad they were there”.
PC Blake explained: “I went into the river because I could not stand by and watch a person drown and die. The lady is very lucky to be alive and I'm pleased that she has a second chance in life”.
PC Lea added: “Our reactions were instantaneous and there was never a moment’s hesitation that we had to try everything to save this lady.”
For more information about the Royal Humane Society please visit http://www.royalhuma
nesociety.org.uk/htm
l/awards.html
Well done , very brave. Hereford Constables Nominated For Award After Brave Actions Two police officers are being nominated for a Royal Humane Society award after helping to rescue a distressed woman from the River Wye on New Years Day. PC Chris Lea and PC Steven Blake both work at Hereford and both joined the police service in 2002.PC Chris Lea and PC Steven Blake At about 3am on 1st January police received a call from a man reporting that a woman was in the river. The rural location between Hereford and Ross on Wye meant that the woman was not easy to trace. When the woman was found PC Blake removed his outer items of uniform, utility belt and body armour and immediately entered the water through deeper and deeper water until he could no longer stand on the bottom. He used the tree trunk and branches as support, but due to the density of branches and the speed of the flood waters he was unable to reach the woman. It was very cold, raining and there was a strong wind blowing. When PC Blake realised he could not reach the woman he came out of the river, used the fallen tree to scale along and dropped down into the water next to the woman. PC Lea entered the river up to his thighs, climbed the tree, edged along it and used his torch to illuminate the area for PC Blake. During the next 20 minutes he continued to relay clear details of what was happening, via his personal radio, to the control room and other colleagues who were arriving. PC Blake lifted the woman’s head up out of the water and held her body up so her head stayed out of the water, she remained unresponsive. The woman’s coat had become caught in a branch which prevented her being swept down the river. PC Blake remained with her in the water until Hereford and Worcestershire Fire and Rescue Service arrived with their inflatable boat. At about 4.35am fire and rescue personnel recovered the woman from the river and also helped PC Blake to the river bank. The woman was then carried part way across the field by a fire and rescue officer. A stretcher was brought over the field by fire and rescue colleagues and PC Lea, who was very wet and cold by this time, also helped to carry the stretcher across the field, over a stile and up a steep bank to a waiting ambulance. The woman was completely unresponsive and received emergency medical treatment from West Midlands Ambulance Service colleagues to try and restore signs of life. She was treated by an on scene trauma doctor and immediately rushed to the Accident and Emergency department at Hereford County Hospital. She was later admitted to the High Dependency Unit in an attempt to stabilise her condition. Later the same day she was awake and able to talk to officers about what had happened. Inspector Bob Barnett said: “We cannot under play the critical role these two officers played in saving this woman’s life. The River Wye was in full flood and exceptionally dangerous. The weather itself was extremely inclement. This coupled with complete darkness would undoubtedly have made both officers apprehensive for their own safety and future of their own families. Yet in the highest traditions of policing in this country both put the life of a complete stranger above their own. “I have no doubt that without the prompt action by both officers, in their initial searching and subsequent entering of the River Wye, this woman would have died. PC Blake’s persistence is of particular note. The measured risks he took in entering the River Wye twice and remaining with her until fire and rescue colleagues arrived ensured that the life of the woman was saved”. The 40 year old woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, is now out of hospital and recovering at home in Herefordshire. She added: “The officers were brilliant, they were really brave and I take my hat off to them. I want to thank them and it’s thanks to them I’m alive. They went beyond the line of duty – it was pitch dark and the river was flooded, I couldn’t feel the bottom. I’m really glad they were there”. PC Blake explained: “I went into the river because I could not stand by and watch a person drown and die. The lady is very lucky to be alive and I'm pleased that she has a second chance in life”. PC Lea added: “Our reactions were instantaneous and there was never a moment’s hesitation that we had to try everything to save this lady.” For more information about the Royal Humane Society please visit http://www.royalhuma nesociety.org.uk/htm l/awards.html Everywhere

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